Blackpool Pleasure Beach Review

Blackpool Pleasure Beach is a tourist destination that has had quite the tumultuous history. From disastrous fires to avalanches, right through to positive things such as the many attractions it provides and the millions of pounds in tourism revenue it brings in, it’s a theme park with a bit of a difference. In terms of the rollercoaster rides it provides, Blackpool Pleasure Beach is no slouch either – this article is a small exploration of which coasters you can expect to ride there and why they will be so enjoyable.

Blackpool Pleasure Beach – A Rollercoaster Review

Blackpool Pleasure Beach is a tourist destination that has had quite the tumultuous history. From disastrous fires to avalanches, right through to positive things such as the many attractions it provides and the millions of pounds in tourism revenue it brings in, it’s a theme park with a bit of a difference. In terms of the rollercoaster rides it provides, Blackpool Pleasure Beach is no slouch either – this article is a small exploration of which coasters you can expect to ride there and why they will be so enjoyable.

Blackpool Pleasure Beach Review

Decades of Pleasure-Based Leisure

Compared to the relatively young sapling that is Alton Towers resort, the roots of the Blackpool Pleasure Beach tree run much deeper into the soil of history. This is demonstrated in the fact that the Blue Flyer, the resort’s second-oldest active rollercoaster, opened in 1934. The oldest, known as The Big Dipper, is an old-school, traditional rollercoaster built in 1923. This particular rollercoaster is what sparked a lifelong love affair with thrill rides for many, and is surely part of many-a-child’s childhoods. It also provides a stunning view of the whole park at multiple points on its 3,300ft track (if you ride it for long enough you’ll probably end up back in 1923).

For a resort to have a rollercoaster (albeit a children’s one) that pre-dates the start of the start of the Second World War by 5 years is quite the impressive feature. Add to that the Wild Mouse, a Wild Wooden Mouse-type rollercoaster opened in 1958 (early years of the Vietnam War, remember?), the Grand National, and the Nickelodeon Streak, and you’ve clearly got a theme park that isn’t just peppered in history but absolutely doused in it.

Blackpool Pleasure Beach Review

Thrill Machines for the Modern Era

The Pleasure Beach isn’t just full of rickety-looking older rides made from wood however: it’s got some more modern works of rollercoaster art as well. The most recent example is a coaster called Infusion. This is a steel inverted rollercoaster that is completely suspended over water. Its 33m height isn’t exactly dizzying but the 2,260ft length, 5 inversions, and top speed of nearly 50mph makes it quite the thrill ride over water.

In 1994, a rollercoaster called The Big One opened at the theme park. This particular model is a hypercoaster that is a little more thrilling than many of the other rides in the park.  This one stands 65m tall at its highest point, with a maximum drop that is only a few meters less than this at 63m. It is easy to see how this rollercoaster broke some world records when it was opened, being the tallest and steepest rollercoaster on the planet at the time. This is the rollercoaster you would simply have to experience if you could only experience the one.

Revolution and Steeplechase are the only two rollercoasters I haven’t yet touched upon here. The former was built in 1979 and is probably the second-most thrilling of all the coasters at the Pleasure Beach. Revolution begins from an elevated point, starting with propelling its subjects through two loops, one forwards and one backwards. This ride subjects those who dare to ride it to significant G-forces, with it touching upon 4Gs at its most extreme. Steeplechase is a milder affair, but this coaster’s appeal is in the fact that it is sadly the very last of its kind (a three-tracked steeplechase coaster) left in existence.

Blackpool Pleasure Beach Review

Incomparable

It’s difficult to sum up the worth of Blackpool Pleasure Beach vs other resorts like Alton Towers or Thorpe Park. It’s like comparing apples and oranges, both sweet and flavourful, but Blackpool Pleasure Beach is the apple that has a rich history and some very decent rides whilst Alton Towers is the orange, lacking in history but abundant with modern coasters that tower over Blackpool’s offerings in terms of pure stats.

The kind of record-breaking history and the generally thrilling collection of rollercoasters at Blackpool Pleasure Beach are just two of the many reasons that you should probably consider paying a visit. . Make a start by heading to the snazzily-designed Pleasure Beach website in order to get a feel for what the resort can offer you.